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Doug Bandow

Senior Fellow, Cato Institute, journalist, syndicated columnist, author of The Politics of Envy: Statism as Theology (1994)


Even Christians who are not libertarians and libertarians who are not Christians have many opportunities to cooperate on protecting religious freedom, restricting state expansion, encouraging private education, keep the government out of child care, opposing welfare systems that destroy families, and so on. And given both group' need to find addition allies, it is increasingly important that Christians and libertarians not only talk with each other, but work together.

1994 - from The Politics of Envy: Statism as Theology
What some social conservatives overlook is that, while the market possesses no morality of its own, it accommodates individuals who value more than just money ... The fact that capitalism protects the right to profit does not mean entrepreneurs are not often engaged in sacrificial and even noble endeavors.

Mar. 19, 1997 - from an editorial column in the Wall Street Journal
Government is not a particularly good teacher of virtue. The state is good at simple tasks, like killing people and seizing their wealth. It has far more trouble reaching inside individuals and making them good. Even attempting to do so is risky. ... Turning morality over to government risks having the same effect as turning charity over to government -- reducing the role of private people and institutions.

Mar. 19, 1997 - from an editorial column in the Wall Street Journal
Put bluntly, lawmakers are stealing from the public... Theft may seem like a strong word for what now routinely comes out of the legislative process. But that's only because we have abandoned any rigorous conception of individual rights and government responsibilities.

1988 - from his column "What Happened to the Concept of Theft?"