Features
Featured Essay
Featured Link

Full Collections
Essays (425)
Quotations (6095)
Links (715)
Books (232)

Other Pages
About Us
Authors
Awards
Bookseller Affiliations
Contact Us
Cookies
Editorial Board
Excellent Essays
Excellent Sites
Liberal Magic
Mush Quotations
Our New Look
Privacy Policy
Sign Up!
Submissions
Amazon.com online bookstore
  


Martin Luther King
1929 - 1968

Civil rights activist, Baptist minister, sociologist, Doctor of Theology, winner of the Nobel Prize for Peace (1963). King was a magnificent orator and the brilliant leader of non-violent protests against segregation and racism in the United States in the 1950's and 1960's. He helped focus the attention of the world on rampant and institutionalized racism, particularly in the southern states, and moved public opinion to the point at which his tragic death by assasination led quickly to legislation banning many of the practices he had campaigned against during his life.


Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

In the End, we will remember not the words of our enemies, but the silence of our friends.

Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.

History is the long and tragic story of the fact that privileged groups seldom give up their unjust posture; ... groups are more immoral than individuals.

Aug. 16, 1963 - from a letter written while in jail in Birmingham, Alabama
If a man is called a streetsweeper, he should sweep streets even as Michelangelo painted, or Beethoven composed music, or Shakespeare wrote poetry. He should sweep streets so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will pause to say, here lived a great streetsweeper who did his job well.

Our scientific power has outrun our spiritual power. We have guided missiles and misguided men.

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.

1958 - from Stride Toward Freedom
The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.

Aug. 16, 1963 - from a letter written while in jail in Birmingham, Alabama
We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the vitriolic words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people.

The function of education is to teach one to think intensively and to think critically... Intelligence plus character - that is the goal of true education.

Was not Jesus an extremist for love - 'Love your enemies, bless them that curse you, pray for them that despitefully use you.'... Was not Abraham Lincoln an extremist - 'This nation cannot survive half slave and half free.' Was not Thomas Jefferson an extremist - 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.' So the question is not whether we will be extremist but what kind of extremist will we be.

Now what is the difference between [just laws and unjust laws]? How does one determine when a law is just or unjust? A just law is a man-made code that squares with the moral law or the law of God. An unjust law is a code that is out of harmony with the moral law. To put it in the terms of Saint Thomas Aquinas, an unjust law is a human law that is not rooted in eternal and natural law.

Aug. 16, 1963 - from a letter written while in jail in Birmingham, Alabama
... the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.

Jun. 1965 - from his commencement address at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, U.S.A.
There is nothing more tragic than to sleep through a revolution.

Jun. 1965 - from his commencement address at Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio, U.S.A.