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Glenn Cartman Loury
1948 -

American doctor of political economy, Director of the Institute for Race and Social Division at Boston University, Member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, columnist and commentator, author of One by One from the Inside Out: Race and Responsibility in America (1994)


It is a tragic irony that, although realizing democratic ideals requires effective civic dialogue across group lines, the very fact of social division can profoundly undermine a polity's capacity for public deliberation. Arguably, this is now the case with respect to debate on questions of race in our society. These debates have been, by turns, hysterical, demagogic, angry, guilt-ridden, or simply inane.

May 1, 1997 - from "Straight Talk Instead of 'Race-Talk'", published by SpeakOut.com
... the central dilemma raised by the problem of race relations in ... public life is this: We cannot ignore race, but must not define ourselves mainly in racial terms.

May 1, 1997 - from "Straight Talk Instead of 'Race-Talk'", published by SpeakOut.com
We say people should be judged by the content of their character and not the color of their skin; yet, we sort, count, respond to, cavort with and assess one another on the basis of race.

May 1, 1997 - from "Straight Talk Instead of 'Race-Talk'", published by SpeakOut.com
In the absence of a unifying vision of what we should be striving for, various groups of [people] defined by race and ethnicity vie with each other in a zero-sum contest for the moral and political high ground.

May 1, 1997 - from "Straight Talk Instead of 'Race-Talk'", published by SpeakOut.com
A people who languish in dependency, while the means through which they might work toward their own advancement exist, have surrendered their claim to dignity, and to the respect of their fellow citizens. A truly free people must accept responsibility for their fate, even when it does not lie wholly in their hands.