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George W. Bush
1946 -

President of the United States (2001 - ), former Governor of Texas, Republican, son of former U.S. President George Bush


The most important tasks of a democracy are done by everyone.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his Inaugural Address
Our public interest depends on private character, on civic duty and family bonds and basic fairness, on uncounted, unhonored acts of decency which give direction to our freedom.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his Inaugural Address
Encouraging responsibility is not a search for scapegoats, it is a call to conscience. And though it requires sacrifice, it brings a deeper fulfillment. We find the fullness of life not only in options, but in commitments.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his Inaugural Address
Government has great responsibilities for public safety and public health, for civil rights and common schools. Yet compassion is the work of a nation, not just a government.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his Inaugural Address
We are bound by ideals that move us beyond our backgrounds, lift us above our interests and teach us what it means to be citizens. Every child must be taught these principles. Every citizen must uphold them.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his Inaugural Address
Civility does not require us to abandon deeply held beliefs. Civility does not demand casual creeds and colorless convictions. ... civility and firm resolve [can] live easily with one another. But civility does mean that our public debate ought to be free from bitterness and anger, rancor and ill will. We have an obligation to make our case, not to demonize our opponents. As the Book of James reminds us, fresh water and salt water cannot flow from the same spring.

Feb. 6, 2001 - from a speech at a national prayer breakfast
Faith ... teaches us not merely to tolerate one another, but to respect one another - to show a regard for different views and the courtesy to listen. This is essential to democracy.

Feb. 6, 2001 - from a speech at a national prayer breakfast
[Community and faith-based charities] do for others what no government can ever do ... Government cannot be replaced by charities, but it can welcome them as partners instead of resenting them as rivals. ... Our plan will not favor religious institutions over non-religious institutions [but] the days of discriminating against religious institutions, simply because they are religious, must come to an end.

Feb. 6, 2001 - from a speech at a national prayer breakfast
[Education vouchers] In order for an accountability system to work, there have to be consequences... If children are trapped in schools that will not teach and will not change, there have to be different consequences.

quoted in "Bush to boomers: A call to grown-ups", by Maggie Gallagher, published by UPS
We must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting our problems instead of passing them on... I ask you to seek a common good beyond your comfort, to defend needed reforms against many attacks, to serve your nation, beginning with your neighbors. I ask you to be citizens. Citizens, not spectators.

Jan. 20, 2001 - from his inaugural address
A hundred years from now, this must not be remembered as an age rich in possessions and poor in ideals.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.
[Bureaucrats are] always seeing the tunnel at the end of the light.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.
Our generation has a chance to reclaim some essential values -- to show we have grown up before we grow old.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.
Iíve described myself as a compassionate conservative, because I am convinced a conservative philosophy is a compassionate philosophy that frees individuals to achieve their highest potential. It is conservative to cut taxes and compassionate to give people more money to spend. It is conservative to insist upon local control of schools and high standards and results; it is compassionate to make sure every child learns to read and no one is left behind. It is conservative to reform the welfare system by insisting on work; itís compassionate to free people from dependency on government. It is conservative to reform the juvenile justice code to insist on consequences for bad behavior; it is compassionate to recognize that discipline and love go hand in hand.

Mar. 7, 1999 - from his speech announcing his consideration of the Republican nomination for the presidency of the United States
... the path of least resistance is always downhill.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.
What is the right thing to do? ... Then do it.

quoted by Bush staffers as a frequent response to potentially-unpopular policy proposals
We must give our children a spirit of moral courage, because their character is our destiny. ... Our schools must support the ideals of parents, elevating character and abstinence from afterthoughts to urgent goals.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.
... times of plenty, like times of crisis, are tests of ... character.

Aug. 3, 2000 - from his speech accepting the nomination of the Republican Party for President of the U.S.