Features
Featured Essay
Featured Link

Full Collections
Essays (425)
Quotations (6095)
Links (715)
Books (232)

Other Pages
About Us
Authors
Awards
Bookseller Affiliations
Contact Us
Cookies
Editorial Board
Excellent Essays
Excellent Sites
Liberal Magic
Mush Quotations
Our New Look
Privacy Policy
Sign Up!
Submissions
Amazon.com online bookstore
  


George Jonas

1935 -

Canadian freelance columnist and journalist. Author of various novels and non-fiction books including Vengeance (1984)


To the dismay of Plato's latter-day disciples who are forever trying to set up the Just Society by central edict, right and wrong are resolved by the inner moral compass of people, though modified from time to time by their religion, common experience, climate, technology, social organization, historic period, and cultural fashion. Even commissars or ayatollahs have to deal with something akin to Immanual Kant's categorical imperative.

Oct. 16, 2000 - from "The evil men do lives after them", published in the National Post
Western left-wing journalists tend to be cynics in relation to their own societies, and naive in relation to trendy Utopias (not to mention ancient or distant cultures.) For instance, they'll know all about the price of capitalism, but little about its value, while they'll see the value of socialism, but won't have a clue about its price.

Feb., 1999 - from "From Soup to Nuts: Aphorisms on liberals and conservatives", published in the Pith Review
Assume you're a feminist. To further your political objective, which is to secure advantages for your group, you need to replace a liberal principle, namely equality, with an illiberal principle, to wit, inequality. It would be bad form for you to say so, of course, but that's not all. In an essentially liberal society such as Canada, pushing inequality would be useless. It simply wouldn't fly. But what if you stuck an adjective -- say, 'formal' -- in front of the word 'equality'? Then you could contrast 'formal equality' with a newly minted concept for inequality that sounded better -- say, 'substantive equality.' Now you're on track. While you couldn't sell the idea of replacing equality with inequality, replacing 'formal equality' with 'substantive equality' might have legs. Presto, the feminist party line.

Mar. 20, 1999 - from "Some more equal than others? Pshaw!", published in the National Post newspaper
[Re: $145 billion U.S. settlement against tobacco companies] Even in an era such as ours, in which we've been trying to redistribute risks in society not according to who incurs them but who can best afford to pay, such an attempt to shift responsibility for our own actions to the "deep pockets" of someone else has reached a new height of absurdity.

Jul. 15, 2000 - from "Just what were they smoking?", published in the National Post
People who aren't especially smart are especially impressed by nimble brains. This is particularly true of people who have been educated beyond their intellectual means, which describes the majority of this country's, or perhaps any country's, chattering classes.

Oct. 16, 2000 - from "The evil men do lives after them", published in the National Post
I'm worried about guns, but I'm more worried about gun control. ... In free societies people shouldn't be called upon to justify their need for anything they wished to own. (Unless they wished to own it for an illegitimate purpose - in which case no 'need' would serve as a justification.) There's nothing abstract about this: it ties in with everyone's daily life. If society demands to know people's 'needs' for their personal choices, and then judges such needs by the tastes or standards of others, it opens the door to tyranny.

Mar. 8, 1995 - from "Questions which shouldn't be asked", published in the Toronto Sun newspaper
... our law is not gender blind, or race blind any longer. Indeed, it's not blind to many other expediencies of the result-oriented state. It's quite true that under the pressure of statist forces, including radical feminists, Canada has snatched the blindfold from the Goddess of Justice. This precisely is the problem. This is how our system is coming to resemble fascism and communism.

Mar. 20, 1999 - from "Some more equal than others? Pshaw!", published in the National Post newspaper
[Former liberal prime minister of Canada Pierre Elliot] Trudeau's vision of Canada as a sheltered multicultural workshop ruled by philosopher princes, policed by human rights commissions and run by assorted social engineers has dominated our country for the last 31 years under both political parties. He must, therefore, take his share of the blame for our high taxes, shrinking dollar, stubborn unemployment, crumbling social services, continuing bi- and multicultural hostilities, gender-warfare, declining family values and diminishing civil liberties.

Oct. 18, 1999 - from "Left wing, charming, and wrong", published in the National Post newspaper
It's possible to quantify the economic results of [former Prime Minister Pierre] Trudeau's legacy of Big Government ... The national debt grew from $11.3 billion in 1968 to $128 billion in 1984. The annual federal deficit went from zero to $25 billion. Ottawa's spending rose from 30% of Canada's total economic output to nearly 53%; our dollar plummeted from around US$1.06 to 66 cents today. The unemployment rate has been running between three and five percentage points higher here than in the United States, and Canada reduced itself from being one of the world's three richest nations 30 years ago (along with Switzerland and the U.S.) to one of the three leading debtor nations in the West, alongside Belgium and Italy.

Oct. 16, 2000 - from "The evil men do lives after them", published in the National Post
I'm part of Canada's 'multicultural reality.' I can confidently say that the immigrants I've known and I have known many had no difficulty swearing an oath of loyalty to the Queen. On the contrary. We came to Canada precisely because we liked, and wanted to adopt, the tradition that the Queen symbolized to us: Individual freedom, liberal democracy and the rule of law. It was indeed a 'British' tradition, because... it existed in few places outside of Great Britain and countries that have elected to model their systems after the best British institutions.

Aug. 1, 1999 - from "May the Queen preserve us", published in the Montreal Gazette newspaper
[Former liberal prime minister of Canada Pierre Elliot] Trudeau suffered from the same statist illusions that affected some of the finest minds of our century. Certain errors require high IQ's. In our times many clever people became mesmerized with the notion that socialism (or at least a form of corporate statism) was the wave of the future. Mr. Trudeau was no exception. He was deeply suspicious of some European traditions, especially the homogenous nation-state, but quite open to many of Europe's most baneful influences, from leftish fads to autocracy.

Oct. 18, 1999 - from "Left wing, charming, and wrong", published in the National Post newspaper
In the first stages of emerging tyrannies the higher echelons of the civil service tend to be filled with true believers. Then, in later stages, true believers give way to plain opportunists.

Feb., 1999 - from "From Soup to Nuts: Aphorisms on liberals and conservatives", published in the Pith Review
Liberals have naive illusions about others, while conservatives have naive illusions about themselves.

Feb., 1999 - from "From Soup to Nuts: Aphorisms on liberals and conservatives", published in the Pith Review
Media fashions may be changing, but several Canadian prisoners of gender politics are still in jail. To this day people wonder how could Germans, a highly civilized people, surrender the best traditions of their society to the pseudo-scientific ravings of Nazi zealots. Perhaps we should wonder no more. We, too, have surrendered some of our legal system to pseudo-scientific ravings. Luckily, our victims number only hundreds, not millions, and most are still alive. We can yet repair the damage.

May 4, 1998 - from "Hysterical lies of the mind", published in the Toronto Sun
Most Canadians who said "no" to Meech Lake and later to Charlottetown [both doomed constitutional proposals of the Mulroney Tory government] weren't rejecting either French Canada or unity. They were merely refusing to carve group politics into stone. They were saying no to a country whose people draw their identities not from being citizens but from belonging to this or that "distinct" tribe, this or that race, this or that income bracket, or even this or that sex or sexual orientation. People said no to replacing Canada with a patchwork of inward-looking, hostile fragments: Francos and Anglos, whites and blacks, immigrants and natives, perhaps even men and women - strangers who co-exist in a state of uneasy truce like passengers on a subway train, sharing a destination but no destiny.

Oct. 16, 2000 - from "The evil men do lives after them", published in the National Post
[Christian clerics agree to a 'protocol office' request to expunge most Christian references from their remarks at a service for the victims of the Swissair crash off Nova Scotia] In their eagerness to render to Caesar what's God's, they provided their own version of the Apostle Peter's, 'I don't know this man,' denying their Saviour before the cock crowed thrice. Why would Christian clerics agree to participate in a memorial service on condition they make no reference to the New Testament or Jesus? How could pastors consent to not declaring their beliefs? Why would they think not confessing Christianity honours Christian victims or comforts Christian survivors? And if it doesn't, what purpose could their participation in a memorial ceremony possibly serve?

Dec. 24th, 1998 - from "Priests betrayed their religion", published in Perspective, Southam News
Certain errors actually require high IQs.

Oct. 16, 2000 - from "The evil men do lives after them", published in the National Post