Features
Featured Essay
Featured Link

Full Collections
Essays (425)
Quotations (6095)
Links (715)
Books (232)

Other Pages
About Us
Authors
Awards
Bookseller Affiliations
Contact Us
Cookies
Editorial Board
Excellent Essays
Excellent Sites
Liberal Magic
Mush Quotations
Our New Look
Privacy Policy
Sign Up!
Submissions
Amazon.com online bookstore
  


William Brooks

1946 -

Canadian educator lecturing at McGill University's Faculty of Eduction


...one of the most striking characteristics of our progressive education system is the obscurity of its aims and objectives.

1975 - from "Some Reflections on Canadian Education", published in the History and Social Science Teacher
Unfortunately, philosophy is no longer taken seriously, either as a source of success or failure in education. The much talked about problems in our schools today are, for the most part, examined in material terms. Aside from the ethnocentric issue of language of instruction, all parties seem to have agreed to discuss education almost entirely as a fiscal issue. The conventional progressive paradigm, albeit with frequent revisions and practical modifications, is fundamentally unchallenged. ... Public officials have conceded control over the content of education to appointed 'professionals' and any trespass into that jurisdiction is regarded with utmost impatience.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
... by the late nineteenth century, the classical curriculum of the British grammar school, imported in the early years of colonial North America, gave way to the ideas of European social revolutionaries like Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbart and Froebels. These philosophers changed our perception of the school's purpose, slowly eroding the traditional concentration on formal literacy and the acquisition of knowledge, and giving way to an increasing concern with the methods of teaching and the interests of the child.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
The development of appropriate educational policy can be crucial to the well-being of a society. Policy developers should not become unwitting slaves to other men's ideas especially when those ideas may become destructive of the goals and purposes of the very societies they seek to serve. ... Before change and a shift to more appropriate policy is possible, the slaves [to current education idealogy] must be set free.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
[After an analysis of the teaching of economics in Canadian high schools] ... we found an unmistakable tilt in economics education toward Fabian and Keynesian themes, and a general absence of the corpus of thought that supported the idea of a free marketplace.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
... the movement spawned by [philosopher and educator John] Dewey at the turn of the century is systematically woven around a common philosophy whose roots are deeply embedded in the intellectual life of nineteenth century Europe. ... not only have progressive educators been social revolutionaries in their own right, but that John Dewey himself owes a yet-to-be-fully-acknowledged debt to Marxism that has produced a profound paradigmatic effect on educational theory and practice throughout this century. Canadian education has borrowed heavily from this paradigm.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
... in 1979, I worked with Professor Yarema Kelebay of McGill University on a project mandated by the Quebec Association of Teachers of History. As two former Presidents of that Association, we were asked to analyze the contents of a new Canadian history syllabus that had been developed for Quebec high schools by the Quebec Ministry of Education. We concluded that the course of study was profoundly anti-capitalist and embraced a Marxist economic interpretation to the exclusion of all other perspectives on Canadian history. The reaction to our conclusions was stormy to say the least, and there was a great deal of opposition to the thesis, primarily on the basis that this was not the sort of thing that should be brought up in polite company.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning
The educational community should never surrender its right to dissent and raise questions about the nature of our culture. The longing to play a role in the development of a good and just society remains one of the highest and most valuable motivations of the teacher. But in the shadow of so many twentieth century societies that have been fractured, vulgarized and impoverished by Marxist ideology, it may be time to begin a more open discourse about the sources of thought that set the agenda for our schools.

Jan. 1994 - from "Was Dewey a Marxist?", published by The St. Lawrence Institute for the Advancement of Learning