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Mark Latham
Australian Member of Parliament for Werriwa

The reform of the welfare state has become one of the great enigmas of ... politics. It is the policy of all yet the program of very few.

Jul. 31, 1996 - from a lecture delivered in Melbourne, Australia
The welfare state has been geared around the mass production of universal services and entitlements. It was designed to meet the needs of an era dominated by Fordist systems of production and work. It was assumed that governments could anticipate the welfare needs of a society locked into predictable patterns of work and family life. The post-industrial transformation of work and society, however, has ended these certainties. Disadvantaged citizens and communities now have a different set of needs: less predictable, less suited to supply side planning and passive welfarism. Their needs are essentially skills-based, requiring the flexible delivery of customised services on a different, more virtual scale of government.

Jul. 31, 1996 - from a lecture delivered in Melbourne, Australia